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Eating disorder association names new board member

January 12, 2012
by News release
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The Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA) a national organization focused on increasing prevention, diagnosis and treatment of binge eating disorders and associated weight stigma, has named chairman and CEO of Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center, James Gresham, to its board of directors.

Through outreach, education and resources, BEDA facilitates awareness, excellence in care and recovery for those who live with and those who treat BED and its associated conditions.
 
"The current BEDA board of directors and I are thrilled to have James join the organization," said Chevese Turner, founder and CEO of BEDA. "We chose him because he brings a wealth of knowledge and a passion for the eating disorders community. This will complement BEDA's efforts to fulfill its mission and provide help and hope to those struggling with binge eating disorder."

Timberline Knolls is a Chicago-based residential treatment center offering an environment of recovery for women and girls ages 12 and older struggling to overcome eating disorders including binge eating disorder, trauma, substance abuse, mood disorders and co-occurring disorders.

"We have a tremendous amount of respect for the work BEDA is doing to help millions of Americans struggling with BED and related issues," said Gresham. "BED is a growing problem in our country. The work BEDA is doing is critical to creating a community where people have access to resources to help them overcome the disorder and live healthy, productive lives free from weight stigma that is so prevalent in our society."

BED affects more than 8 million people in the U.S. and it accounts for three times the number of those diagnosed with anorexia and bulimia together. BEDA hosts several events throughout the year including the BEDA National Conference, March 2-4 in Philadelphia. In addition, it will hold the first annual National Weight Stigma Awareness Week, Sept. 26-30.

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