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Four rules for behavioral health interventions on campus

August 2, 2012
by Dennis Grantham, Editor-in-Chief
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University of Colorado officials developed the kind of behavioral health assessment team cited in this article, and a member of that team identified alleged Aurora gunman James Hughes as a threat. But the fact that the issue went further indicates, perhap
Attorney Carolyn Wolf offers advice about how to intervene with troubled students.

The following article appeared in our March 2011 special issue, After Tucson.  But the message it carries resonates clearly today in light of the fact that the alleged gunman in the recent Aurora, Colorado shootings, James Holmes, was yet another troubled student.  University of Colorado officials developed the kind of behavioral health assessment team cited in this article, and a member of that team identified Hughes as a threat. But the fact that the issue went further indicates, perhaps, that there's more to learn and consider.  With the issue of violence by troubled students on the front burner again, I thought it would be time to revisit the topic.     --    Dennis Grantham, Editor in Chief

 

Misunderstanding slows behavioral health intervention on campus

In the wake of shooting tragedies involving college students--Virginia Tech, Tucson, and now, Auror--and continued concern about student suicides or suicide attempts, colleges and universities nationwide grapple with knotty questions: What can we learn, what can we do, how can we reduce the likelihood of such violent incidents?

However, the first roadblock that such institutions often encounter in their efforts to act in the best interests of student and campus safety is a fear of lawsuits, spurred by a pervasive misunderstanding and misinterpretation of educational and health privacy laws, says Carolyn Reinach Wolf, an attorney specializing in higher education and mental health issues at Abrams Fensterman (Lake Success, New York).

While many people know of medical privacy laws like HIPAA and of educational privacy laws like the Federal Education Records Privacy Act (FERPA), Wolf asserts that few people actually know these laws, or the related state laws that govern the confidentiality of medical and educational records. Accordingly, she hands out a few pieces of advice:

1) Know the law-and especially-know the exceptions!

As important as it is for institutional leaders to “know the law,” Wolf says that “it is even more important to know the exceptions to these laws. All of these laws allow for communication of information under certain circumstances.” She cites one little known example:

“Under the FERPA education law-the federal law that governs the privacy of educational records-there is an almost unknown exception that if your child is a dependent on your tax return, you have a right to access that information. No one knows that exception,” she states, asking, “How many kids do you know on college campuses that aren't dependents?” Parents may also be involved in the event of underage substance abuse and student health and safety emergencies.

There are many more allowances for information disclosure without consent to officials with a legitimate interest in student education, student transfers, student financial aid, student health and safety emergencies, law enforcement and juvenile or criminal justice.

2) Use common sense.

“In situations where you need parental notification, everybody is so worried about whether they're going to get sued if they call parents,” says Wolf, exclaiming that, “Common sense has absolutely gone out the window,” says Wolf. “Instead of thinking about the threat of a lawsuit, ask yourself, ‘what's the most practical, common-sense response to this circumstance?’ If there's an issue of harm-a child who is suicidal or involved in a life-threatening situation, maybe it is more important to speak to the parents first and worry about the rest later.” Wolf, a former hospital risk manager, calls this “picking your liability.”

Carolyn reinach wolf is a senior partner of the abrams law firm on long island, n.y. and is responsible for the mental health law practice area. she can be reached at cwolf@abramslaw.com.
Carolyn Reinach Wolf is a senior partner of the Abrams law firm on Long Island, N.Y. and is responsible for the mental health law practice area. She can be reached at cwolf@abramslaw.com.

“As an administrator,” she continues, “I'd rather be sued for allegedly violating a student's confidentiality than for a wrongful death.” Despite widespread concern about the threat of lawsuits for possible violations, Wolf says that in reality, such lawsuits are “very hard to find” for two reasons: First, she asks, “how many 18 year olds do you know that have a lawyer on retainer? What's the likelihood of a lawsuit really happening?” And second, she wonders, “What's the likelihood of a court accepting a lawsuit, let alone upholding it, when a school is obviously acting in the best interests of a student or there is a health and safety issue involved?”

Her response: “Close to zero, if not zero.”

3) Err on the side of the student's best interests.

Wolf advises, “People need to stop worrying about, ‘Am I going to get sued?’” There's always a chance of that, she acknowledges, but says that fear of a lawsuit is not a good reason to make a decision.

“I'd rather be sued for allegedly violating a student's confidentiality than for a wrongful death.”

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